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News Release | ConnPIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection

Spirit Is Most Complained-About Airline

Spirit Airlines passengers are most likely to complain about their experience, according to a report released today by the ConnPIRG Education Fund. Among major airlines, Spirit generates the most complaints for its size and generates an increasing number of complaints each year. Other most-complained about firms include Frontier Airlines, United Airlines, and American Airlines.

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Report | ConnPIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection

The Unfriendly Skies

Consolidation in the airline industry, along with pressures created by new security rules and the recent high cost of aviation gasoline, has changed the way we fly. It seems as if every consumer has an airline travel story—how they were trapped on the tarmac, tricked by fees, missed their connection, or lost their bag.

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Media Hit | Budget

Report: Connecticut’s Fiscal Transparency Improves

Connecticut earns a “B” for transparency in government spending, according to an annual report card grading the 50 states in online access to data on where taxpayer dollars are spent.

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News Release | ConnPIRG Education Fund | Budget

New Report: Connecticut Receives a “B” in Annual Report on Transparency of Government Spending

Connecticut received a B when it comes to government spending transparency, according to “Following the Money 2014: How the 50 States Rate in Providing Online Access to Government Spending Data,” the fifth annual report of its kind by the ConnPIRG Education Fund. 

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Report | ConnPIRG Education Fund | Budget

Following the Money 2014

Every year, state governments spend tens of billions of dollars through contracts for goods and services, subsidies to encourage economic development, and other expenditures. Accountability and public scrutiny are necessary to ensure that the public can trust that state funds are well spent. 

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Media Hit | Transportation

Amtrak's Ambitious, High-Speed Rail Plan Includes Hartford

Amtrak officials have unveiled their vision for true high-speed service along the Northeast Corridor, a $117 billion plan that includes service to Hartford. The proposed new high-speed service between Washington and Boston, with trains that could travel at 220 miles per hour, would require its own dedicated tracks and a new route north of New York away from the congested seacoast, said Amtrak president Joseph Boardman.

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Egg Oversight in America is Scrambled

500 million eggs, across 24 brands, are potentially infected with Salmonella enteritidis. All of these eggs were traced back to just two Iowa producers, Wright County Egg, owned by Austin “Jack” DeCoster, and Hillandale Farms, in which DeCoster is a major investor.

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With McDonald's Recall, State Cadmium Ban Looking Timely

A legislative ban on the sale of children's jewelry containing cadmium, a heavy metal linked to negative health effects in children, was proposed by a bipartisan group of lawmakers, including Rep. Diana Urban, D-North Stonington, and squeaked through the House of Representatives in the final minute of the legislative session that ended last month.

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CT House Passes Ban on Cadmium in Children's Products

State Representatives Chris Perone (D-Norwalk) announced that the Connecticut House of Representatives unanimously passed legislation that will prohibit the sale, manufacturing, and distribution of children’s jewelry that contains cadmium.

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News Release | Transportation

New Data: Public Transportation Projects Create More Jobs Than Building Highways

HARTFORD – Stimulus money invested in public transportation projects created twice as many jobs as highway projects, according to a new report released today by ConnPIRG, in conjunction with the Center for Neighborhood Technology and Smart Growth America.

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Mixed Signals: How TV Retailers Mislead Consumers on the Digital Television (DTV) Transition

One year from now 22 million Americans who rely on free over-the-air analog broadcasting will be at risk of losing access to TV. On February 17, 2009, analog televisions that receive over-the-air signals will go dark, unless they are retrofitted with digital converter boxes. For many Americans who are hearing about the transition for the first time, information about the change comes from electronic store retailers, where consumers ask what is necessary to maintain TV reception-- a primary source for news, information and entertainment.

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